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The Info List - William Cameron Sproul


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William Cameron Sproul
William Cameron Sproul
(September 16, 1870 – March 21, 1928) was the 27th Governor of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
from 1919 to 1923.[1]

Contents

1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 References 4 External links

Biography[edit] Sproul was born at John Douglass House
John Douglass House
in Colerain Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
on September 16, 1870. The Sproul family relocated to Chester, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
in 1883, where Sproul graduated from Chester High School in 1887.[2] He received a postsecondary education at Swarthmore College, from which he graduated with honors in 1891. In college, he was a member of Phi Kappa Psi
Phi Kappa Psi
Fraternity. After graduation, Sproul acquired an interest in the Franklin Printing Company of Philadelphia. Sproul later purchased a half interest in the Chester Times.[3] Sproul was employed in the field of newspaper publishing, and he arose to the rank of president of the Chester Daily Times. He additionally made a substantial sum through investments in railroads and manufacturing interests. A prominent Republican, Sproul served in the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State Senate from 1897 to 1919. In 1911, he drafted the landmark Sproul Highway Act, which created the state highway system. In 1918, Sproul was elected as the 27th Governor of Pennsylvania, serving in this capacity until 1923. As governor, he focused extensively on expanding funding for education, roadway construction, and veterans' services. He also spurred an effort to expand state forest land so as to replenish the state's woodlands after years of degradation by lumber companies. Sproul was a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination in 1920. He was later offered the nomination for vice president on a ticket with Warren Harding, but he declined the opportunity. In 1926, Sproul chaired the bi-state committee that organized the construction of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge
Benjamin Franklin Bridge
between Philadelphia and Camden. Although Sproul was a millioniare, he died intestate on March 21, 1928.[4][1] He was buried at the Chester Rural Cemetery. Legacy[edit] His birthplace is known as the John Douglass House, listed on the National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
in 1990.[5] Sproul Hall, a residence hall on the campus of Penn State University, is named after William Cameron Sproul. Governor Sproul Apartments located in Broomall, Pennsylvania, is named after William Cameron Sproul. Sproul Estates, in Wallingford, Pennsylvania, a residential development named after Governor Sproul, is built on the site of his former residence. Sproul State Forest
Sproul State Forest
in Clinton and Centre counties is named for him. References[edit]

^ a b "William C. Sproul, Ex-Governor, Dies. Former Pennsylvania Executive Succumbs at 57 After Illness of Several Months. Began Life As Farmer Boy. After College He Bought Interest in a Newspaper, but Later Took Up Financial Interests". New York Times. March 22, 1928. Retrieved December 27, 2013. William Cameron Sproul, former Governor of Pennsylvania, three times President of the Union League of Philadelphia and a nationally known figure in Republican politics, died at his home, Lapidea Manor, near Chester, shortly before 10 o'clock tonight ....  ^ Ashmead, Henry Graham (1914). History of the Delaware County National Bank. Chester, Pennsylvania: Press of the Chester Times. p. 159. Retrieved 1 March 2018.  ^ Ashmead, Henry Graham (1914). History of the Delaware County National Bank. Chester, Pennsylvania: Press of the Chester Times. p. 159. Retrieved 1 March 2018.  ^ "Governor William Cameron Sproul". www.phmc.state.pa.us. Retrieved 3 March 2018.  ^ National Park Service
National Park Service
(2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 

PHMC: William Cameron Sproul
William Cameron Sproul
biography Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Governors Past to Present: Governor William Cameron Sproul

External links[edit]

Biography portal

Works by or about William Cameron Sproul
William Cameron Sproul
at Internet Archive William Cameron Sproul
William Cameron Sproul
at Find a Grave

Party political offices

Preceded by Martin Brumbaugh Republican nominee for Governor of Pennsylvania 1918 Succeeded by Gifford Pinchot

Political offices

Preceded by Martin Brumbaugh Governor of Pennsylvania 1919–1923 Succeeded by Gifford Pinchot

Preceded by Henry Justin Allen Chair of the National Governors Association 1919–1922 Succeeded by Channing H. Cox

v t e

Governors and Presidents of Pennsylvania

Presidents (1777–90)

Wharton Bryan Reed Moore Dickinson Franklin Mifflin

Governors (since 1790)

Mifflin McKean Snyder Findlay Hiester Shulze G. Wolf Ritner Porter Shunk Johnston Bigler Pollock Packer Curtin Geary Hartranft Hoyt Pattison Beaver Pattison Hastings Stone Pennypacker Stuart Tener Brumbaugh Sproul Pinchot Fisher Pinchot Earle James Martin Bell Duff Fine Leader Lawrence Scranton Shafer Shapp Thornburgh Casey Ridge Schweiker Rendell Corbett T. Wolf

v t e

Chairs of the National Governors Association

Willson McGovern Walsh Spry Capper Harrington Allen Sproul Cox Trinkle Brewster McMullen Dern Case Pollard Rolph McNutt Peery Cochran Stark Vanderbilt Stassen O'Conor Saltonstall Maw Martin Caldwell Hildreth Hunt Lane Carlson Lausche Peterson Shivers Thornton Kennon Langlie Stanley Stratton Collins Boggs McNichols Powell Rosellini Anderson Sawyer Reed Guy Volpe Ellington Love Hearnes Moore Mandel Evans Rampton Ray Andrus Askew Milliken Carroll Bowen Busbee Snelling Matheson J. Thompson Carlin Alexander Clinton Sununu Baliles Branstad Gardner Ashcroft Romer Campbell Dean T. Thompson Miller Voinovich Carper Leavitt Glendening Engler Patton Kempthorne Warner Huckabee Napolitano Pawlenty Rendell Douglas Manchin Gregoire Heineman Markell Fallin Hickenlooper Herbert McAuliffe Sandoval

v t e

(1916 ←) United States
United States
presidential election, 1920 (→ 1924)

Democratic Party Convention

Nominee

James M. Cox

VP nominee

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Candidates

William Gibbs McAdoo A. Mitchell Palmer Al Smith John W. Davis Edward I. Edwards Woodrow Wilson Robert Latham Owen

Republican Party Convention

Nominee

Warren G. Harding

VP nominee

Calvin Coolidge

Candidates

Leonard Wood Frank Orren Lowden Hiram Johnson William Cameron Sproul Nicholas Murray Butler Calvin Coolidge Robert M. La Follette, Sr. Jeter Connelly Pritchard Miles Poindexter Howard Sutherland Herbert Hoover

Third party and independent candidates

Socialist Party of America

Nominee

Eugene V. Debs

VP nominee

Seymour Stedman

Farmer–Labor Party

Nominee

Parley P. Christensen

VP nominee

Max S. Hayes

Prohibition Party

Nominee

Aaron S. Watkins

VP nominee

D. Leigh Colvin

American Party

Nominee

James E. Ferguson

VP nominee

William J. Hough

Socialist Labor Party

Nominee

William Wesley Cox

VP nominee

August Gillhaus

Single Tax

Nominee

Robert Colvin Macauley

VP nominee

Richard C. Barnum

Other 1920 elections: House Senate

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 6502383 LCCN: n88277658 SUDOC: 168657104 SNAC: w6sq9192

This article about a member of the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State Senate is a stub. You can help by expandi

.
William Cameron Sproul
HOME
The Info List - William Cameron Sproul


--- Advertisement ---



William Cameron Sproul
William Cameron Sproul
(September 16, 1870 – March 21, 1928) was the 27th Governor of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
from 1919 to 1923.[1]

Contents

1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 References 4 External links

Biography[edit] Sproul was born at John Douglass House
John Douglass House
in Colerain Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
on September 16, 1870. The Sproul family relocated to Chester, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
in 1883, where Sproul graduated from Chester High School in 1887.[2] He received a postsecondary education at Swarthmore College, from which he graduated with honors in 1891. In college, he was a member of Phi Kappa Psi
Phi Kappa Psi
Fraternity. After graduation, Sproul acquired an interest in the Franklin Printing Company of Philadelphia. Sproul later purchased a half interest in the Chester Times.[3] Sproul was employed in the field of newspaper publishing, and he arose to the rank of president of the Chester Daily Times. He additionally made a substantial sum through investments in railroads and manufacturing interests. A prominent Republican, Sproul served in the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State Senate from 1897 to 1919. In 1911, he drafted the landmark Sproul Highway Act, which created the state highway system. In 1918, Sproul was elected as the 27th Governor of Pennsylvania, serving in this capacity until 1923. As governor, he focused extensively on expanding funding for education, roadway construction, and veterans' services. He also spurred an effort to expand state forest land so as to replenish the state's woodlands after years of degradation by lumber companies. Sproul was a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination in 1920. He was later offered the nomination for vice president on a ticket with Warren Harding, but he declined the opportunity. In 1926, Sproul chaired the bi-state committee that organized the construction of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge
Benjamin Franklin Bridge
between Philadelphia and Camden. Although Sproul was a millioniare, he died intestate on March 21, 1928.[4][1] He was buried at the Chester Rural Cemetery. Legacy[edit] His birthplace is known as the John Douglass House, listed on the National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
in 1990.[5] Sproul Hall, a residence hall on the campus of Penn State University, is named after William Cameron Sproul. Governor Sproul Apartments located in Broomall, Pennsylvania, is named after William Cameron Sproul. Sproul Estates, in Wallingford, Pennsylvania, a residential development named after Governor Sproul, is built on the site of his former residence. Sproul State Forest
Sproul State Forest
in Clinton and Centre counties is named for him. References[edit]

^ a b "William C. Sproul, Ex-Governor, Dies. Former Pennsylvania Executive Succumbs at 57 After Illness of Several Months. Began Life As Farmer Boy. After College He Bought Interest in a Newspaper, but Later Took Up Financial Interests". New York Times. March 22, 1928. Retrieved December 27, 2013. William Cameron Sproul, former Governor of Pennsylvania, three times President of the Union League of Philadelphia and a nationally known figure in Republican politics, died at his home, Lapidea Manor, near Chester, shortly before 10 o'clock tonight ....  ^ Ashmead, Henry Graham (1914). History of the Delaware County National Bank. Chester, Pennsylvania: Press of the Chester Times. p. 159. Retrieved 1 March 2018.  ^ Ashmead, Henry Graham (1914). History of the Delaware County National Bank. Chester, Pennsylvania: Press of the Chester Times. p. 159. Retrieved 1 March 2018.  ^ "Governor William Cameron Sproul". www.phmc.state.pa.us. Retrieved 3 March 2018.  ^ National Park Service
National Park Service
(2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 

PHMC: William Cameron Sproul
William Cameron Sproul
biography Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Governors Past to Present: Governor William Cameron Sproul

External links[edit]

Biography portal

Works by or about William Cameron Sproul
William Cameron Sproul
at Internet Archive William Cameron Sproul
William Cameron Sproul
at Find a Grave

Party political offices

Preceded by Martin Brumbaugh Republican nominee for Governor of Pennsylvania 1918 Succeeded by Gifford Pinchot

Political offices

Preceded by Martin Brumbaugh Governor of Pennsylvania 1919–1923 Succeeded by Gifford Pinchot

Preceded by Henry Justin Allen Chair of the National Governors Association 1919–1922 Succeeded by Channing H. Cox

v t e

Governors and Presidents of Pennsylvania

Presidents (1777–90)

Wharton Bryan Reed Moore Dickinson Franklin Mifflin

Governors (since 1790)

Mifflin McKean Snyder Findlay Hiester Shulze G. Wolf Ritner Porter Shunk Johnston Bigler Pollock Packer Curtin Geary Hartranft Hoyt Pattison Beaver Pattison Hastings Stone Pennypacker Stuart Tener Brumbaugh Sproul Pinchot Fisher Pinchot Earle James Martin Bell Duff Fine Leader Lawrence Scranton Shafer Shapp Thornburgh Casey Ridge Schweiker Rendell Corbett T. Wolf

v t e

Chairs of the National Governors Association

Willson McGovern Walsh Spry Capper Harrington Allen Sproul Cox Trinkle Brewster McMullen Dern Case Pollard Rolph McNutt Peery Cochran Stark Vanderbilt Stassen O'Conor Saltonstall Maw Martin Caldwell Hildreth Hunt Lane Carlson Lausche Peterson Shivers Thornton Kennon Langlie Stanley Stratton Collins Boggs McNichols Powell Rosellini Anderson Sawyer Reed Guy Volpe Ellington Love Hearnes Moore Mandel Evans Rampton Ray Andrus Askew Milliken Carroll Bowen Busbee Snelling Matheson J. Thompson Carlin Alexander Clinton Sununu Baliles Branstad Gardner Ashcroft Romer Campbell Dean T. Thompson Miller Voinovich Carper Leavitt Glendening Engler Patton Kempthorne Warner Huckabee Napolitano Pawlenty Rendell Douglas Manchin Gregoire Heineman Markell Fallin Hickenlooper Herbert McAuliffe Sandoval

v t e

(1916 ←) United States
United States
presidential election, 1920 (→ 1924)

Democratic Party Convention

Nominee

James M. Cox

VP nominee

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Candidates

William Gibbs McAdoo A. Mitchell Palmer Al Smith John W. Davis Edward I. Edwards Woodrow Wilson Robert Latham Owen

Republican Party Convention

Nominee

Warren G. Harding

VP nominee

Calvin Coolidge

Candidates

Leonard Wood Frank Orren Lowden Hiram Johnson William Cameron Sproul Nicholas Murray Butler Calvin Coolidge Robert M. La Follette, Sr. Jeter Connelly Pritchard Miles Poindexter Howard Sutherland Herbert Hoover

Third party and independent candidates

Socialist Party of America

Nominee

Eugene V. Debs

VP nominee

Seymour Stedman

Farmer–Labor Party

Nominee

Parley P. Christensen

VP nominee

Max S. Hayes

Prohibition Party

Nominee

Aaron S. Watkins

VP nominee

D. Leigh Colvin

American Party

Nominee

James E. Ferguson

VP nominee

William J. Hough

Socialist Labor Party

Nominee

William Wesley Cox

VP nominee

August Gillhaus

Single Tax

Nominee

Robert Colvin Macauley

VP nominee

Richard C. Barnum

Other 1920 elections: House Senate

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 6502383 LCCN: n88277658 SUDOC: 168657104 SNAC: w6sq9192

This article about a member of the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State Senate is a stub. You can help by expandi

.
l> William Cameron Sproul
HOME
The Info List - William Cameron Sproul


--- Advertisement ---



William Cameron Sproul
William Cameron Sproul
(September 16, 1870 – March 21, 1928) was the 27th Governor of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
from 1919 to 1923.[1]

Contents

1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 References 4 External links

Biography[edit] Sproul was born at John Douglass House
John Douglass House
in Colerain Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
on September 16, 1870. The Sproul family relocated to Chester, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
in 1883, where Sproul graduated from Chester High School in 1887.[2] He received a postsecondary education at Swarthmore College, from which he graduated with honors in 1891. In college, he was a member of Phi Kappa Psi
Phi Kappa Psi
Fraternity. After graduation, Sproul acquired an interest in the Franklin Printing Company of Philadelphia. Sproul later purchased a half interest in the Chester Times.[3] Sproul was employed in the field of newspaper publishing, and he arose to the rank of president of the Chester Daily Times. He additionally made a substantial sum through investments in railroads and manufacturing interests. A prominent Republican, Sproul served in the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State Senate from 1897 to 1919. In 1911, he drafted the landmark Sproul Highway Act, which created the state highway system. In 1918, Sproul was elected as the 27th Governor of Pennsylvania, serving in this capacity until 1923. As governor, he focused extensively on expanding funding for education, roadway construction, and veterans' services. He also spurred an effort to expand state forest land so as to replenish the state's woodlands after years of degradation by lumber companies. Sproul was a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination in 1920. He was later offered the nomination for vice president on a ticket with Warren Harding, but he declined the opportunity. In 1926, Sproul chaired the bi-state committee that organized the construction of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge
Benjamin Franklin Bridge
between Philadelphia and Camden. Although Sproul was a millioniare, he died intestate on March 21, 1928.[4][1] He was buried at the Chester Rural Cemetery. Legacy[edit] His birthplace is known as the John Douglass House, listed on the National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
in 1990.[5] Sproul Hall, a residence hall on the campus of Penn State University, is named after William Cameron Sproul. Governor Sproul Apartments located in Broomall, Pennsylvania, is named after William Cameron Sproul. Sproul Estates, in Wallingford, Pennsylvania, a residential development named after Governor Sproul, is built on the site of his former residence. Sproul State Forest
Sproul State Forest
in Clinton and Centre counties is named for him. References[edit]

^ a b "William C. Sproul, Ex-Governor, Dies. Former Pennsylvania Executive Succumbs at 57 After Illness of Several Months. Began Life As Farmer Boy. After College He Bought Interest in a Newspaper, but Later Took Up Financial Interests". New York Times. March 22, 1928. Retrieved December 27, 2013. William Cameron Sproul, former Governor of Pennsylvania, three times President of the Union League of Philadelphia and a nationally known figure in Republican politics, died at his home, Lapidea Manor, near Chester, shortly before 10 o'clock tonight ....  ^ Ashmead, Henry Graham (1914). History of the Delaware County National Bank. Chester, Pennsylvania: Press of the Chester Times. p. 159. Retrieved 1 March 2018.  ^ Ashmead, Henry Graham (1914). History of the Delaware County National Bank. Chester, Pennsylvania: Press of the Chester Times. p. 159. Retrieved 1 March 2018.  ^ "Governor William Cameron Sproul". www.phmc.state.pa.us. Retrieved 3 March 2018.  ^ National Park Service
National Park Service
(2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 

PHMC: William Cameron Sproul
William Cameron Sproul
biography Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Governors Past to Present: Governor William Cameron Sproul

External links[edit]

Biography portal

Works by or about William Cameron Sproul
William Cameron Sproul
at Internet Archive William Cameron Sproul
William Cameron Sproul
at Find a Grave

Party political offices

Preceded by Martin Brumbaugh Republican nominee for Governor of Pennsylvania 1918 Succeeded by Gifford Pinchot

Political offices

Preceded by Martin Brumbaugh Governor of Pennsylvania 1919–1923 Succeeded by Gifford Pinchot

Preceded by Henry Justin Allen Chair of the National Governors Association 1919–1922 Succeeded by Channing H. Cox

v t e

Governors and Presidents of Pennsylvania

Presidents (1777–90)

Wharton Bryan Reed Moore Dickinson Franklin Mifflin

Governors (since 1790)

Mifflin McKean Snyder Findlay Hiester Shulze G. Wolf Ritner Porter Shunk Johnston Bigler Pollock Packer Curtin Geary Hartranft Hoyt Pattison Beaver Pattison Hastings Stone Pennypacker Stuart Tener Brumbaugh Sproul Pinchot Fisher Pinchot Earle James Martin Bell Duff Fine Leader Lawrence Scranton Shafer Shapp Thornburgh Casey Ridge Schweiker Rendell Corbett T. Wolf

v t e

Chairs of the National Governors Association

Willson McGovern Walsh Spry Capper Harrington Allen Sproul Cox Trinkle Brewster McMullen Dern Case Pollard Rolph McNutt Peery Cochran Stark Vanderbilt Stassen O'Conor Saltonstall Maw Martin Caldwell Hildreth Hunt Lane Carlson Lausche Peterson Shivers Thornton Kennon Langlie Stanley Stratton Collins Boggs McNichols Powell Rosellini Anderson Sawyer Reed Guy Volpe Ellington Love Hearnes Moore Mandel Evans Rampton Ray Andrus Askew Milliken Carroll Bowen Busbee Snelling Matheson J. Thompson Carlin Alexander Clinton Sununu Baliles Branstad Gardner Ashcroft Romer Campbell Dean T. Thompson Miller Voinovich Carper Leavitt Glendening Engler Patton Kempthorne Warner Huckabee Napolitano Pawlenty Rendell Douglas Manchin Gregoire Heineman Markell Fallin Hickenlooper Herbert McAuliffe Sandoval

v t e

(1916 ←) United States
United States
presidential election, 1920 (→ 1924)

Democratic Party Convention

Nominee

James M. Cox

VP nominee

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Candidates

William Gibbs McAdoo A. Mitchell Palmer Al Smith John W. Davis Edward I. Edwards Woodrow Wilson Robert Latham Owen

Republican Party Convention

Nominee

Warren G. Harding

VP nominee

Calvin Coolidge

Candidates

Leonard Wood Frank Orren Lowden Hiram Johnson William Cameron Sproul Nicholas Murray Butler Calvin Coolidge Robert M. La Follette, Sr. Jeter Connelly Pritchard Miles Poindexter Howard Sutherland Herbert Hoover

Third party and independent candidates

Socialist Party of America

Nominee

Eugene V. Debs

VP nominee

Seymour Stedman

Farmer–Labor Party

Nominee

Parley P. Christensen

VP nominee

Max S. Hayes

Prohibition Party

Nominee

Aaron S. Watkins

VP nominee

D. Leigh Colvin

American Party

Nominee

James E. Ferguson

VP nominee

William J. Hough

Socialist Labor Party

Nominee

William Wesley Cox

VP nominee

August Gillhaus

Single Tax

Nominee

Robert Colvin Macauley

VP nominee

Richard C. Barnum

Other 1920 elections: House Senate

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 6502383 LCCN: n88277658 SUDOC: 168657104 SNAC: w6sq9192

This article about a member of the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State Senate is a stub. You can help by expandi

.

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